Famous People with Moles

December 28, 2011

Famous People with Moles

The secret of America’s supermodel, Cindy Crawford may be out. The latest research suggests that people with a bounty of moles, like the mole that Cindy Crawford sports on her upper lip, may possess tauter muscles and stronger bones. Beauty spots or moles, for which Cindy Crawford is famous for, are created by an abnormal collection of pigment cells present within the skin. Moles begin to grow on children as young as four but usually disappear when people are about forty. In a number of people, however, moles keep growing as people become older.

A panel at King’s College in London, presented at a conference of the RSM (Royal Society of Medicine) a few weeks ago, showed that people with moles may also have wrinkle-free skin that can make a person look up to seven years younger than their real age. People with moles may also be protected from other signs of aging such as failing eyesight and heart disease. This latest evidence contrasts with previous cautions that moles may be connected to the threat of skin cancer.

Underlying this research is the premise that people with a lot of moles have been found to transmit white blood cells with further long “telomeres”- the additional ends of chromosomes in every cell that transmit the genetic material. While the average human being has 30-40 small moles, a few have as much as 400. It is thought that 10 to 20 % of Caucasians have 100 moles.

Researchers at the King’s College found that extensive telomeres may defend not only skin and bones from the results of ageing, but also the heart, muscles and eyes. Three genes connected with telomere piece and mole growth have been recognized. Dr. Tim Spector, professor head of genetic epidemiology and the twin research department, believes the relation between moles and ageing had been simulated by a group studying the similar phenomenon in Brisbane. “At present [we] know people who don’t mature and are baby-faced at sixty are likely to have many of them,” Dr. Spector said.

The connection between moles and ageing is in contrast to studies that show moles represent an increased threat of skin cancer. Nonetheless, Veronique Bataille, a dermatologist who is also leading the King’s College research, states that cruel melanoma remains unusual. Furthermore, other studies have shown that telomere extent and the pace of successive cell death are connected with people’s wellbeing.

 

The secret of America’s supermodel, Cindy Crawford may be out. The latest research suggests that people with a bounty of moles, like the mole that Cindy Crawford sports on her upper lip, may possess tauter muscles and stronger bones. Beauty spots or moles, for which Cindy Crawford is famous for, are created by an abnormal collection of pigment cells present within the skin. Moles begin to grow on children as young as four but usually disappear when people are about forty. In a number of people, however, moles keep growing as people become older.

A panel at King’s College in London, presented at a conference of the RSM (Royal Society of Medicine) a few weeks ago, showed that people with moles may also have wrinkle-free skin that can make a person look up to seven years younger than their real age. People with moles may also be protected from other signs of aging such as failing eyesight and heart disease. This latest evidence contrasts with previous cautions that moles may be connected to the threat of skin cancer.

Underlying this research is the premise that people with a lot of moles have been found to transmit white blood cells with further long “telomeres”- the additional ends of chromosomes in every cell that transmit the genetic material. While the average human being has 30-40 small moles, a few have as much as 400. It is thought that 10 to 20 % of Caucasians have 100 moles.

Researchers at the King’s College found that extensive telomeres may defend not only skin and bones from the results of ageing, but also the heart, muscles and eyes. Three genes connected with telomere piece and mole growth have been recognized. Dr. Tim Spector, professor head of genetic epidemiology and the twin research department, believes the relation between moles and ageing had been simulated by a group studying the similar phenomenon in Brisbane. “At present [we] know people who don’t mature and are baby-faced at sixty are likely to have many of them,” Dr. Spector said.

The connection between moles and ageing is in contrast to studies that show moles represent an increased threat of skin cancer. Nonetheless, Veronique Bataille, a dermatologist who is also leading the King’s College research, states that cruel melanoma remains unusual. Furthermore, other studies have shown that telomere extent and the pace of successive cell death are connected with people’s wellbeing.

moles

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